Project Overview

The best place to start irrigating your garden is with a pen and paper. We’ll show you how to measure and plot your garden perimeter, including any obstacles, and measure your water pressure to give you an accurate plan to irrigate your garden. 

Continue to step-by-step instructions
This D.I.Y. Advice is part of a series How To Install Sprayers and Drippers

Step by Step Instructions

1 Measure up and map your garden
2 Measure your water pressure
  • Step 1. Measure up and map your garden

    Measure out your garden. Then note your measurements down on some grid paper - make 1m2 in your garden equal 1cm2 on your paper to keep things easy. Draw out the map, including any obstacles in your garden such as trees. You can now work out how many metres of polytube you’re going to need for your irrigation system.

  • Step 2. Measure your water pressure

    To work out how many and what type of sprinklers, pop ups or drippers, you’ll need to measure the water pressure on your garden tap. To do this, measure the time in seconds it takes to fill up a 9L bucket at your tap on full pressure. Then using the size of the bucket, which in our case was 9L, divide it by the seconds it took to fill up, then multiply by 60. For example, if it took 20 seconds to fill up then 9 ÷ 20 x 60 will give you the number of your maximum flow rate per minute. This will help you choose what products you need to irrigate your garden. 

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Bucket
  • Calculator
  • Measuring tape
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • 4

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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