Project Overview

Temporary fencing is an effective way to keep an area like a building site secure for a short period of time. Its design means it can be assembled on almost any surface and it is easy to take apart and store once your job is over. This video shows you everything you need to know to safely erect your fence. Continue to step-by-step instructions

Step by Step Instructions

1 Install a fence panel
2 Use brackets to connect the fence panels together
3 Install safety struts
  • Step 1. Install a fence panel

    Set one of the concrete blocks in position. Place one leg of a fence panel into one of the holes in the concrete block. Position the panel along the line you want the fence to travel. Then position a second concrete block for the other end of the panel.
  • Step 2. Use brackets to connect the fence panels together

    Connect the fence panels using a bracket up the top of the vertical struts. The bracket is locked into place using a nut and bolt. Tighten the nut firmly using a spanner or a torque wrench. To make everything as safe as possible, keep the nut and thread side facing inwards.
  • Step 3. Install safety struts

    Safety struts anchor your fence in place and keep it from toppling over. Once your fence is up, connect the struts to the back of each panel using brackets. Connect one bracket down near the bottom of the vertical strut, and the other somewhere near the middle. To increase the stability, weigh the safety strut down with concrete blocks.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Shifting spanner

Materials

  • Brackets
  • Concrete blocks
  • Fence panels
  • Safety struts

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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