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A Bunnings team member lifting the lid on a smoker BBQ to reveal a smoking brisket
So you’ve decided to get into smoking meats and don’t know where to start? There are heaps of options out there and they all have their own mouth-watering benefits. If you want to get your smoke on you’ve come to the right place. We’ve got all the tips about our different types of smokers to help you decide which is the one for you.

Bullet smoker

This smoker gets its name from its bullet shape and dome lid. It holds heat really well, which makes it great for low and slow style cooking. The internal temperature can be easily controlled by using the water pan or by adjusting the smoker’s vents. Bullet smokers are able to cook on multiple levels and are great for smoking meats like lamb, chicken, pork and beef. Their small size also makes them ideal for small spaces or courtyard cooking.

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Vertical smoker

Vertical smokers come in gas or charcoal. Their vertical design and heavy steel construction reduces the amount of fuel required and means you are able to separate your meats and cook on multiple levels. 

These smokers are great for chicken, ribs, brisket and pork shoulders and suit beginners because they’re really affordable and easy to use.

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Barrel smoker

The barrel smoker shows that you can get complex flavours out of a simple design. It features only a charcoal basket, cooking racks and meat hooks. On a barrel smoker the heat source is directly underneath the cooking area and it holds a steady temp making it great for low and slow cooks. Adjusting the temp of a barrel smoker is easy, cook without the lid to turn up heat, leave it on to smoke.

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Offset smoker

An offset smoker is made for those big cook ups. On an offset, the heat source is set off to one side and the chimney draws smoke through. A variety of fuels can be used including lump wood charcoal and hardwood. An offset smoker needs to be checked to ensure ideal temperature and smoke flow. As such it suits advanced smokers, or beginners who are up for a challenge.

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Pellet smoker

This smoker is fueled by wood pellets that produce a clean burn with a light smoke flavour. Its design consists of an external hopper that holds the pellets and an auger that feeds them into an internal fire pit. Food is separated from the fire by a metal plate, which means no flare-ups and no grease falls into the fire pit. The pellet smoker has superior temperature control and is very energy efficient. It can also be used as a grill as well as a smoker.

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Kamado smoker

The kamado smoker, the ultimate all-rounder, was invented in China and has remained largely unchanged for centuries. It’s easy to use thanks to its simple design and can grill and bake as well as smoke. A kamado can be used for ‘slow and low’ or for faster direct heat style cooking, all the way to making pizza and steaming rice. This smoker is generally fuelled by lump wood charcoal, though gas and electric versions are also available.

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Kettle smoker

You may not have realised but the kettle smoker is named for its distinctive kettle shape – funny that. It’s easy to use and versatile, it comprises a lid, venting system, cooking and charcoal grid and a lower chamber. Its design allows heat and smoke to circulate evenly and its dual vent system allows for precise control over temp.

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Spit roaster

When someone arrives at your place and sees a spit roaster in action they know what they are in for – a glorious feast of the most delicious meats. The slow rotation of the spit ensures meat is cooked evenly and because it looks amazing it’s where the crowd gathers. When cooking, fats from the meat drip onto the hot charcoal beneath, causing smoke to surround and penetrate. If you’re looking to make an awesome impression the spit is it.

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Shop the range

Take a look at our wide range of smokers to find the one that is just right for you.

 

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More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.