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Rack of lamb ribs with thermometer stuck into it.
Did you know you can use your BBQ to cook a delicious roast? The team at BBQ Buddy share a few hints and tips on how to do this.

What is indirect cooking?

You can roast meat on the BBQ using indirect cooking. This is when food is not exposed to direct heat, but instead uses the surrounding heat to cook. To achieve this, you'll need to use a hooded BBQ.

Use a BBQ Buddy enamel tray or aluminium drip tray together with a BBQ Buddy roasting rack and place the tray into the BBQ.

Cooking the roast

Once the roast begins to cook, insert the BBQ Buddy digital thermometer prong into the thickest part of the meat to get an accurate reading. The roasting time will depend on the weight and type of meat you’re cooking. For example, if you’re cooking a roast pork weighing 1.7kg, the cooking time will be approximately 1.5 hours.

Suggested cooking times - per 500g

Cooking style

Rare: 1520 minutes
Medium: 2025 minutes
Well done: 2530 minutes

Large joints of pork may need 30 minutes extra if thick
Chicken time varies to beef/lamb/pork
Temperature should be moderate - hot (200°C)
4045 minutes per kg

Resting the roast

For ideal results, it's recommended that you remove the meat from the heat 5°C-10°C before the desired temperature is reached to prevent overcooking. Your meat will continue to cook even after it has been removed from the heat. Always rest your meat for at least 5 minutes before carving.

Cooking safely

The Food Safety Information Council advises poultry, sausages, hamburgers and rolled roast meats should reach 75°C to ensure all food poisoning bacteria is eliminated.

If you're cooking a piece of meat, refer to the below temperature guidelines.

Beef/lamb

Rare: 52°C
Medium: 62°C
Medium-well: 65°C
Well done: 71°C

Pork

Medium: 65°C
Well done: 71°C

Get barbecuing today

Discover the full range of BBQ Buddy accessories available at your local Bunnings.

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.