Project Overview

Installing hinges and doors on a flat pack kitchen is an easy job when you know how to do it. We’ll show you how to put on the hinges and attach the doors to cabinets. We also explain how to get your doors sitting perfectly using the internal adjustment screws on the hinges.

Continue to step-by-step instructions
This D.I.Y. Advice is part of a series How To Assemble and Install Kitchen Base Cabinets

Step by Step Instructions

1 Screw the hinge onto the door
2 Install hinge back plate onto cabinet
3 Attach the door to the cabinet and adjust to finish
  • Step 1. Screw the hinge onto the door

    The hinges for flat pack cupboard doors come in two sections – the first screws on to the door and the second screws on to the cabinet. Start by disconnecting the two sections of the hinge and screw the door section onto the pre-drilled hole.
  • Step 2. Install hinge back plate onto cabinet

    Now attach the back plate of the hinge to the cabinet. The back plate has oval holes that allow it to be shifted slightly up or down when you fit the door. Make sure you leave these screws slightly loose so it’s easy to make minor adjustments if required.
  • Step 3. Attach the door to the cabinet and adjust to finish

    The hinges have internal screws that allow you to adjust where the door sits on the face of the cabinet. You can adjust for height, depth and angle. Screw these half way in and clip the hinges onto the back panels. Make sure the doors are sitting at the right height and tighten the screws on the back plate. Use the internal screws to adjust how the doors sit on the cabinet. 

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Impact driver
  • Phillips head screwdriver

Materials

  • Door
  • Hinges
  • 4

    Suggested products from our range

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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