Three ways to use decorative wall panelling

Make your walls sing with these three projects, starring decorative panelling.

Bunnings magazine, April 2019

Turn your walls into a statement feature

Walls are often taken for granted as a simple backdrop, but the addition of texture can turn them into a statement feature and give your whole room a unique vibe. We’ve used Easycraft panels to create three very different settings.

The cobblestone style from the Easycraft Expression Series gives a living room scheme (pictured above) ski-chalet good looks; EasyRegency panels create cosiness and bring a hint of country style to a dining nook, while the EasyAscot version brings sophistication and formal elegance to a bedroom.

Idea 1: Retro lounge

Tools and materials

- Safety equipment
- Measuring tape
- Hand or power saw
- Stud finder
- 10mm spacers
- Spirit level
- Hammer
- Nail punch
- Rubber roller
- Easycraft ‘Expressions Series’ 2720mm x 1200mm x 9mm primed interior wall panel in Cobblestone
- Acrylic stud adhesive
- 30-40mm bullet head nails
- Wood filler
- Gap filler with caulking gun
- Sandpaper
- Paint

Steps

1. Measure the wall, from the ceiling or base of the cornice to the floor and subtract 10mm from the final length to allow for expansion. 

2. Cut the panel to the appropriate height, positioning with the manufacturer’s edge at the top and the cut edge at the bottom, where it can be hidden by the skirting board (or hearth pad, as here). If only using a single panel, remove the ‘tongue’ on the relevant side of the board – this can be easily taken off.

3. Locate the studs behind your wall, as these will be the fixing points. Position the board flush with the ceiling or base of the cornice. Rest the board on 10mm spacers to raise it off the floor and use a spirit level to make sure the board is plumb. Apply stud adhesive in walnut-sized dabs every 300mm, hang the board and secure with nails through the studs.

4. Use a nail punch to drive the nails slightly below the panel surface. Use wood filler to fill the nail holes, and sandable gap filler to fill the joins at the cornice. 

5. Sand wood filler and gap filler until smooth (the panel is already primed for painting), then paint using a rubber roller, as this will prevent paint going into the grooves, emphasising the pattern. 

Tip: Use an appropriate stud finder to locate studs and any potential hazards. If the panels cross live wires or plumbing, enlist the help of a licensed tradesperson

Safety: Around a fireplace, ensure a minimum distance of 300mm between the sides of the firebox and the wall panel, and 600mm between the top of the hot air outlet and the panel. (See the fireplace manufacturer’s recommended exclusion zone for timber-based products.)

country nook
 

Idea 2: Country nook

Tools and materials

- Safety equipment
- Measuring tape
- Hand or power saw
- Stud finder
- Spirit level
- Hammer & mallet
- Nail punch
- Easycraft ‘EasyRegency’ 2400mm x 1200mm x 9mm primed MDF interior wall lining panels
- Acrylic stud adhesive
- 30-40mm bullet head nails
- Wood filler and gap filler with caulking gun
- Sandpaper
- Paint

Steps

1. Measure the wall width, marking every 1200mm (to see how many panels you need). Measure the height, from the cornice to floor, then subtract 10mm to allow for expansion. 

2. Cut the panels to the appropriate height, positioning them with the manufacturer’s edge at the top and the cut edge at the bottom, where it can be hidden by the skirting board. 

3. Locate the studs behind the wall, as these will be the fixing points. Position the first board flush with the ceiling or cornice base and with a 5mm gap at the corner edge to allow for expansion. Rest the board on 10mm spacers to raise it off the floor and use a spirit level to make sure the board is plumb. Apply stud adhesive in walnut-sized dabs every 300mm, hang the boards and secure with nails through the studs. Each board slots neatly into the side of the next, but to achieve a tighter join, line up an offcut against the edge of the board and tap with a mallet.

4. Punch in the nails. Use wood filler to fill the nail holes. Use sandable gap filler to fill the joins at the cornice and corners. 

5. Sand wood filler and gap filler until smooth (the panel is already primed for painting), then paint with your choice of colour.

Tip: For an internal corner such as this, the board can be butted right up against the adjoining wall. For external corners, you will need to cut a mitred edge.

classical bedroom

Idea 3: Classic bedroom

Tools and materials

- Safety equipment
- Measuring tape
- Hand or power saw
- Stud finder
- Spirit level 
- Hammer and mallet
- Nail punch
- Easycraft ‘EasyAscot’ 2700mm x 600mm x 9mm pre-primed interior wall panels
- Acrylic stud adhesive
- 30-40mm bullet head nails
- Wood filler and sandable gap filler with caulking gun
- Sandpaper
- Paint

Steps

1. Measure the width of the wall and divide by 600mm (the width of a board). Find the centre of the wall and work out from here, measuring 300mm either side of the centre point and then marking 600mm increments. 

2. Measure the wall’s height, from the base of the cornice to the floor, then subtract 10mm to allow for expansion. Cut the panels to the appropriate height, with manufacturer’s edge at the top and cut edge at the bottom, where it can be hidden by a skirting board. 

3. Measure from the corner to the first marking, which will become the width 
of the first board. This will likely be less than a full board. Cut the first board to fit. Note: the panels are reversible, so you can display the smooth side if you’ve cut through the pattern. 

4. Locate the studs behind the wall, as these will be the fixing points. Position the board on 10mm spacers to raise it off the floor and use a spirit level to make sure it is plumb. Apply stud adhesive in walnut-sized dabs every 300mm, hang the boards and secure with nails through the studs. Each board slots neatly into the side of the next, but to achieve a tighter join, line up an offcut against the edge of the board and tap with a mallet. As you install each panel, use a spirit level to make sure the profile on each board lines up perfectly with the next. The last board should be the same width as the first board (in the opposite corner), but measure again to double check before cutting. 

5. Punch in the nails. Use a wood filler to fill the nail holes and the joins between the panels. Use sandable gap filler to fill the joins at the cornice and corners. 

6. Sand the wood filler and gap filler until smooth (the panel itself is already primed for painting), then paint. 

Tip: For a neat finish on a single panel, try using Easycraft Vogue dado rail, cut to size, as vertical capping on either side

Wall panelling for every room

Check out your local Bunnings to view our full range of Easycraft wall panels and speak to an expert for more advice on how to achieve any of these looks in your home.

Photo credit: Sue Stubbs

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