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A finished vanity with dowel front panel

Overview

Do you have a white vanity that could use a facelift? Try upcycling! It’s cost-effective and easier than you might think. Plus, you can really customise the final look, choosing colours and finishes that suit your style. 

If this sounds like the D.I.Y. project for you, follow our easy guide to two of our favourite ways to upcycle your vanity.

Safety tip: Always wear the appropriate safety equipment (safety glasses, ear muffs, gloves and mask, for example) and always follow the instructions for the product or equipment. 

Natural dowel look

1Measure your vanity

Using a tape measure, record the height and width of each vanity drawer door.

A tape measure being used to measure a white vanity

2Measure the length of each dowel

Using a tape measure and pencil, measure the height of each dowel so that it is the same height as your vanity drawer door. Cut to size. Repeat for as many dowels as it takes to fill out the front of your vanity. (You can also ask one of our friendly Team Members in-store to cut the dowel to size for you.)

Green Bunnings hammer
Tip: Cut and measure one dowel and use this as a guide for the remainder of your dowels to make sure they’re all the same length. 
A dowel being measured and marked with a tape measure and pencil

3Apply glue to the vanity

Remove the vanity drawer and unscrew the vanity door if needed. Apply a generous amount of construction adhesive across the front of each vanity door. You can use a piece of cardboard to spread out the construction adhesive. 

Glue being applied to the vanity with a caulking gun

4Glue down the dowel

Take your dowels and carefully place them down side-by-side on top of the construction adhesive. Repeat until the vanity door is complete.

Dowel being laid onto the surface of a vanity with glue

5Reattach the dowel vanity

You can now reattach your vanity door to your vanity. To tie the look together, apply a larger piece of dowel across the top of the vanity.

Vanity dowel being attached to the top of a vanity panel

6Warm and inviting

And there you have it: a natural, soothing timber-look vanity for your bathroom.

A finished vanity with dowel front panel

Elegant scallop look

1Measure your vanity

Using a tape measure, record the height and width of each vanity drawer door.

A tape measure being used to measure a white vanity

2Measure the scallop panels

Mark out the dimensions of the vanity drawer doors on your scallop panels and cut to size. (You can also ask one of our friendly Team Members in-store to pre-cut the panels for you.)

A scallop panel being measured and marked with a tape measure and pencil

3Paint the scallop panels (if desired)

Using a paint brush and a tin of paint, paint the scallop panels the colour of your choice. Make sure the paint is suitable for bathrooms.

A scallop panel being painted white with a paintbrush

4Mark and pre-screw or drill

Next, mark out where you want to place the new handles or knobs. Pre-screw or drill into the vanity to create a hole.

Pilot hole and screws being drilled into a vanity with a screwdriver

5Attach the scallop panels

Apply a generous amount of construction adhesive to the scallop panel and attach it to the vanity. Repeat steps until all drawer surfaces are complete.

A scallop panel attached to a drawer being slid into the vanity

6Drill into the scallop panels

Using a power drill, drill a hole into the scallop panel. Make sure it lines up with the hole you drilled earlier into the vanity.

Holes being drilled into a scallop panel with a power drill

7Attach vanity knobs

Using a screwdriver, attach the handles or knobs of your choice to the vanity. Repeat for other drawers if necessary.

And there you have it: a classy and elegant scalloped vanity. 

Knobs being attached to a vanity using a screwdriver

8Upcycle your white vanity

Check out our range of dowels and scallop panels, perfect for your D.I.Y. vanity upcycling project! 

A finished vanity with scallop panels

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.