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A screw being drilled into the back of a kitchen wall cabinet

Overview

Wall cabinets are a great way to create extra storage space above bench tops in a kitchen. We'll show you how to mount the cabinets and keep them level while you screw them into the wall. You will also see what equipment you can use to make the job a little easier.

Steps

1Mark the line on the wall for the base of the kitchen cabinet

Choose where you want the cabinets to sit above your benchtop. A standard height is 600mm. Measure and mark that point above the bench. Then use a spirit level to draw a horizontal line at that height.
A bare kitchen wall being measured by a Bunnings team member

2Lift the cabinets up into place

Put a couple of cloths down to protect the surface of your benchtop. Then place your cabinet stands on top of the cloths and adjust their height to the line on your wall. Get someone to help you lift the cabinets on to the stands and hold them in place. Adjust the stands to get the cabinets perfectly level.
Bunnings team members installing a kitchen cabinet

3Screw the cabinets to the wall

Find the studs in the wall behind the cabinet and mark their positions on the cabinet. Pre-drill holes through the rear of the cabinet into the studs. Then secure the cabinets to the wall with large screws. The cabinets are quite heavy, so putting screws into the wall studs will help to hold them securely in place.
A screw being drilled into the back of a kitchen wall cabinet

4Attach the doors to the wall cabinets

Attach the cupboard doors to the cabinets by clicking the hinges onto the plates. The hinges have internal screws so you can adjust where the doors sit on the cabinets. Use a Phillips head screwdriver to adjust them for height, depth and angle.
Push to open hinges being fitted inside a kitchen cabinet

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Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.