D.I.Y. brick planter box

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D.I.Y. brick planter box

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Project Overview

Breathe new life into your outdoors with a brick planter box. It’s a great way to brighten up any bare areas with colourful plants and flowers. And being made of brick it will stand the test of time, and become a permanent landscaping feature you’ll be proud of for years to come. 

Continue to step-by-step instructions

Step by Step Instructions

1 Make the ground level
2 Measure the size of the planter box
3 Mix the mortar
4 Lay the first bricks
5 Lay the front bricks for the planter box
6 Cut a brick in half
7 Lay the second course of bricks
8 Lay the third course of bricks
9 Wipe away excess mortar
10 Lay a concrete cap
11 Paint the concrete cap
12 Waterproof the planter box
13 Blooming marvellous
  • Step 1. Make the ground level

    Before you start, make sure the ground is level. Use a shovel to dig out the area. Then, use the level to make sure it’s flat. We’re laying our bricks on compacted road base and don’t need to lay a base or footings for the planter. But if you were building your planter box higher, and didn’t have road base, you might need to lay a foundation and footings before laying the bricks.

  • Step 2. Measure the size of the planter box

    We’re making our planter box two bricks wide with a 10mm gap for the mortar, so it’s 490mm wide and 1825mm long. Lay the two bricks that’ll make up one side of the planter box, into place. Hammer in a peg next to them. Measure 490mm out from where the other side of the planter box is, then hammer in a peg. Run a string line between the pegs to mark where to lay the bricks.

  • Step 3. Mix the mortar

    You can use a wheelbarrow or a mixer to make the mortar. It’s important to follow the instructions on the cement bag. Be careful not to add too much water. The ideal mortar mix should have a firm consistency. To check for the ideal consistency, hold the trowel upside down with mortar on it, a thin layer of the mortar should stay on the trowel.

  • Step 4. Lay the first bricks

    Lay a bed of mortar on the ground, about 25mm thick. Embed the first brick into the mortar. Apply 10mm of mortar at one end of the second brick and place it next to the first. Check to see that the two bricks are level and straight. Wipe off any excess mortar as you go. Repeat this step for the other side. Then check that the two sides are level with each other. Adjust your string line, so that it’s in line with the bricks.

  • Step 5. Lay the front bricks for the planter box

    Repeat the above steps to lay the first course. First, lay down a bed of mortar on the ground. Apply mortar to one end of the brick and lay it next to the side wall. Tap it down with the trowel so that it’s the same height as the string line. Repeat this to lay the other bricks. It’s important that the first course is level and straight. It will make laying the other courses much easier.

  • Step 6. Cut a brick in half

    We’re laying our bricks in a half bond, which means the underlying brick is covered by a brick to the halfway mark. To cut the brick, measure and mark the halfway point. Use the hammer and bolster to cut the brick in half.

  • Step 7. Lay the second course of bricks

    Once the brick is cut, continue to lay the bricks, starting with the half brick being laid closest to the wall. Follow the pattern of embedding the brick in mortar and butter each end. Make sure the bricks remain level and straight.

     Quick tip to butter a brick: don’t have too much mortar on the end of the trowel. Gently place the mortar on one side, then the other, and push it down so that it covers the full end surface of the brick.

  • Step 8. Lay the third course of bricks

    Once the corners of the first course of bricks are in place, you can use purpose-built corner blocks to hold the string line in place. Continue laying until you have laid three courses of bricks.

  • Step 9. Wipe away excess mortar

    While the mortar is still wet, use a damp sponge to wipe away any excess mortar and to smooth out the joints. 

  • Step 10. Lay a concrete cap

    Once you’ve laid the brick planter box, finish the top off with a concrete cap. Use the same process to lay the cap that you used with the bricks. Apply mortar to the base and between each end of the cap. Leave the planter box to fully cure. This could take up to seven days.

  • Step 11. Paint the concrete cap

    You can leave the concrete cap natural or paint it. We painted ours so that it matches the colour scheme of the house.

  • Step 12. Waterproof the planter box

    If you’re going to be filling the planter box with soil you will need to waterproof the bricks. Wait at least seven days for the mortar to dry before applying a bitumen based paint to the bricks.

  • Step 13. Blooming marvellous

    Now that you’ve finished your planter box, all you have to do is add some colour with flowers and plants. As the seasons change you can change what you grow in the planter box, knowing that you built it to last.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Brickies trowel
  • Bucket
  • Cement mixer
  • Cold chisel
  • Dust mask
  • Ear protection
  • Hammer
  • Jointing tool
  • Paint brush
  • Pointing trowel
  • Rubber mallet
  • Safety glasses
  • Shovel
  • Spirit level
  • Stirrer
  • Tin opener
  • Wheelbarrow
  • Work gloves

Materials

  • 500mm x 150mm x 30mm concrete risers
  • Bricks
  • Brickies sand
  • Brickies line or spray paint marker
  • Cement
  • Exterior paint
  • Hydrated lime
  • Sponge
  • Star pickets or pegs
  • String line
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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