D.I.Y. wooden pallet wine bar

Nick, Team member
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D.I.Y. wooden pallet wine bar

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Project Overview

It’s amazing what you can do with two old pallets and some timber. This rustic-looking pallet bar will look great in your backyard or your home when you’re entertaining family and friends. We’ll show you how to make one in a few simple steps. Continue to step-by-step instructions
bent nail
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How to remove a bent nail

If a nail bends as you hammer it in, don’t try to straighten it, just remove it. The easiest way to do this is to place a thin piece of timber beside the nail to support the hammer and protect the surface. Fit the claw of the hammer under the nail head and pull the handle towards you until the nail comes out. Keep the handle as close to vertical as possible so you don’t make the nail hole wider.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Measure and mark the halfway point on the pallet
2 Cut the pallet in half
3 Measure and mark the 45-degree mitre cuts
4 Cut the ends of the pallet
5 Measure and mark for the supports
6 Cutting the supports with a drop saw
7 Secure the supports
8 Join the pallets together
9 Measure for the decking supports
10 Cut the decking supports
11 Attach the decking supports to the bar
12 Measure and mark for the hardwood bar top
13 Cut the timber for the bar top
14 Fit the front piece of timber
15 Measure and mark for the side pieces of timber
16 Cut the timber
17 Attach the tops of the bar
18 Putty the holes and joins
19 Varnish the top of the bar
20 Relax at your new bar
  • Step 1. Measure and mark the halfway point on the pallet

    Start this project by cutting one of the pallets in half to make the two sides for the bar. Measure and mark the centre point on the pallet where you’re going to make the cut. Then turn the pallet over and measure and mark the centre point on that side as well.
  • Step 2. Cut the pallet in half

    Use the circular saw to cut one side of the pallet in half. Turn it over and then cut the other side. If the circular saw doesn’t cut all the way through, you can use a hand saw to finish the job. Don’t forget to always wear your safety gear when using the circular saw.
  • Step 3. Measure and mark the 45-degree mitre cuts

    Stand the pallet on its side. Use the set square to measure and mark 45-degree angles at the ends of the pallet you’ve cut.
  • Step 4. Cut the ends of the pallet

    Use the circular saw to make the cuts where you’ve marked. When cutting the mitres, an extra pair of hands can be helpful to balance the pallet. A good tip to make sure you don’t hit any nails when making the cuts is to remove any boards that will be sawn. These can be easily replaced once you’ve made your cuts.
  • Step 5. Measure and mark for the supports

    The supports are the fixing points for your bar. Measure the size of the gaps in the pallet, and then transfer these measurements onto the 90mm x 45mm treated pine.
  • Step 6. Cutting the supports with a drop saw

    Use the drop saw to cut the timber for the supports to length.
  • Step 7. Secure the supports

    Use a hammer to knock the supports into place. Pre-drill the holes with a 5.5mm drill bit. Then fix the supports into place with the 75mm bugle screws.
  • Step 8. Join the pallets together

    Once the supports are in place, it’s time to join the pallet and the two halves together to make the base of the bar. Pre-drill the holes with a 5.5mm drill bit and then drive the 75mm bugle screws into the treated pine supports to join the three pallet pieces together.
  • Step 9. Measure for the decking supports

    The decking supports are attached to the front and back of the pallet frame, helping to straighten and support the bar frame. Measure each side of the top of the pallet frame and transfer these measurements to the timber decking.
  • Step 10. Cut the decking supports

    Use the drop saw to cut the decking supports to size.
  • Step 11. Attach the decking supports to the bar

    Use the fixing gun to attach the supports to the front and back of the pallets.
  • Step 12. Measure and mark for the hardwood bar top

    Measure the lengths of the three pallet frames and transfer these measurements onto the hardwood timber for the bar top.
  • Step 13. Cut the timber for the bar top

    The three pieces of hardwood timber will need a combination of straight and 45-degree mitre cuts so that the bar top follows the contours of the bar frame. Set the mitre saw to 45 degrees and cut the two shorter pieces of timber to size. Cut the piece of timber that is attached to the front of the bar at 90 degrees.
  • Step 14. Fit the front piece of timber

    Put the piece of timber for the front of the bar into place. We left a lip at the front and a 50mm overhang at the back. Pre-drill holes using a 5.5mm bit, then countersink using a 16mm spade bit. Use the 75mm bugle screws to fix it into place.
  • Step 15. Measure and mark for the side pieces of timber

    Place the side pieces of timber for the bar top in place, remembering to leave a 50mm lip at the back. Follow the line of the bar at the front and make 45-degree pencil lines straight across with your square so that the timber matches the shape of the bar.
  • Step 16. Cut the timber

    Use the drop saw to cut the edges of the two pieces of timber at 45 degrees.
  • Step 17. Attach the tops of the bar

    Place one of the side pieces in place. Pre-drill a hole using a 5.5mm bit and then countersink using a 16mm spade bit. Screw into place with the 75mm bugle screws. Repeat this to fix the other piece of timber to the top of the bar.
  • Step 18. Putty the holes and joins

    Use wood putty to fill the screw holes and any gaps in the joins at the top of the bar. Let the putty dry and sand it to create a smooth surface. Start with 40 grit sandpaper to flatten out the lumps and finish off with 240 grit sandpaper. Wipe away any dust.
  • Step 19. Varnish the top of the bar

    You can paint or varnish your bar to suit your style. We used an exterior grade varnish so it can be left outside. You might need to apply several coats, so let each one dry before lightly sanding and applying the next coat. To personalise your bar, you can also add a drinks shelf by repeating the process of creating the bar top.
  • Step 20. Relax at your new bar

    Your new pallet bar will look great in its place in your backyard or inside your home; and its rustic look will be a good conversation starter.
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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