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Person hooking up shade sail.

Overview

Shade sails can be used to protect your plants from the elements or you can install them over an entertaining area to protect you from the sun. They're easy to install and we'll show you how. In this video we attach a shade sail to three posts that have already been installed and checked by a qualified builder.

Steps

1Measure and mark the poles

Measure an equal distance down from the top and mark the centre on each pole.

2Pre-drill the holes

Using your drill, pre-drill holes through all of the marks on each post.  

3Attach the anchor fittings

Attach the anchor fitting through the holes of one post. Tighten it by hand, using the nut and washer. 

4Tighten the anchor fitting

Insert your screwdriver through the eye of the fitting and place your spanner around the nut on the other side of the pole. Twist the fitting as tight as you can get it. Repeat Steps 3 & 4 for the other poles.

5Attach the turnbuckles to the shade cloth

Attach the turnbuckle to a D-link and thread that through the hole of one corner of the shade cloth. Then insert the D-link bolt and screw it in to attach the turnbuckle. 

6Attach the corners to the poles

Attach the other D-links to the other two corners of the shade sail. Then hook those up to two of the poles and secure with the D-link bolts.

7Attach the turnbuckle to the last pole

Now take the last corner of your shade sail and hook the turnbuckle through the eye of the anchor fitting on the remaining pole.

8Tighten the shade cloth with the turnbuckle

Once you've hooked up your shade sail, it's important to tighten it. Adjust the turnbuckle and make sure that the tension is even across the whole shade sail. 

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More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.