Bunnings logo with a piece of holly.
Icon - Website - Mobile - Add to project list.svgIcon - Website - Mobile - Cart.svg

Sign in to your account

Project list

Sign in to your account

A completed wooden pallet wine bar in an outdoor entertaining area, with two bottles of beer, two wine glasses, and two bottles of Pellegrino

Overview

It's amazing what you can do with 2 old pallets and some timber. This rustic-looking pallet bar will look great in your backyard or your home when you're entertaining family and friends. We'll show you how to make one in a few simple steps.

Steps

1Measure and mark the halfway point on the pallet

Start this project by cutting 1 of the pallets in half to make the 2 sides for the bar. Measure and mark the centre point on the pallet where you're going to make the cut. Then turn the pallet over and measure and mark the centre point on that side as well.
A tape measure being used to mark a wooden pallet for cutting by a Bunnings team member

2Cut the pallet in half

Use the circular saw to cut one side of the pallet in half. Turn it over and then cut the other side. If the circular saw doesn't cut all the way through, you can use a hand saw to finish the job. Don't forget to always wear your safety gear when using the circular saw.
A Bunnings team member cutting into a wooden pallet

3Measure and mark the 45-degree mitre cuts

Stand the pallet on its side. Use the set square to measure and mark 45-degree angles at the ends of the pallet you've cut.
A Bunnings team member marking a wooden pallet with a pencil for making an angled cut into one side

4Cut the ends of the pallet

Use the circular saw to make the cuts where you've marked. When cutting the mitres, an extra pair of hands can be helpful to balance the pallet. A good tip to make sure you don't hit any nails when making the cuts is to remove any boards that will be sawn. These can be easily replaced once you've made your cuts.
A corner of part of a wooden pallet being cut free by a Bunnings team member

5Measure and mark for the supports

The supports are the fixing points for your bar. Measure the size of the gaps in the pallet, and then transfer these measurements onto the 90mm x 45mm treated pine.
A pencil and tape measure being used to mark a wooden pallet for cutting

6Cutting the supports with a drop saw

Use the drop saw to cut the timber for the supports to length.
A circular saw being used to cut a length of timber

7Secure the supports

Use a hammer to knock the supports into place. Pre-drill the holes with a 5.5mm drill bit. Then fix the supports into place with the 75mm bugle screws.
A hole being drilled into the frame of a pallet wine bar frame for a screw

8Join the pallets together

Once the supports are in place, it's time to join the pallet and the two halves together to make the base of the bar. Pre-drill the holes with a 5.5mm drill bit and then drive the 75mm bugle screws into the treated pine supports to join the three pallet pieces together.
Two ends of a pallet cut in half and being drilled into by a Bunnings team member

9Measure for the decking supports

The decking supports are attached to the front and back of the pallet frame, helping to straighten and support the bar frame. Measure each side of the top of the pallet frame and transfer these measurements to the timber decking.
A pencil and tape measure being used to mark a piece of timber for cutting

10Cut the decking supports

Use the drop saw to cut the decking supports to size.
A mitre saw being used to cut a length of timber for a bar counter

11Attach the decking supports to the bar

Use the fixing gun to attach the supports to the front and back of the pallets.
A timber support beam being nailed to a frame constructed from a wooden pallet

12Measure and mark for the hardwood bar top

Measure the lengths of the 3 pallet frames and transfer these measurements onto the hardwood timber for the bar top.
A length of timber being marked for cutting with a pencil and tape measure

13Cut the timber for the bar top

The 3 pieces of hardwood timber will need a combination of straight and 45-degree mitre cuts so that the bar top follows the contours of the bar frame. Set the mitre saw to 45-degrees and cut the two shorter pieces of timber to size. Cut the piece of timber that is attached to the front of the bar at 90-degrees.
A mitre saw being used to cut a length of timber for a bar counter

14Fit the front piece of timber

Put the piece of timber for the front of the bar into place. We left a lip at the front and a 50mm overhang at the back. Pre-drill holes using a 5.5mm bit, then countersink using a 16mm spade bit. Use the 75mm bugle screws to fix it into place.
A hole being drilled into a bar counter for a screw

15Measure and mark for the side pieces of timber

Place the side pieces of timber for the bar top in place, remembering to leave a 50mm lip at the back. Follow the line of the bar at the front and make 45-degree pencil lines straight across with your square so that the timber matches the shape of the bar.
A square rule being used to position a wine bar counter onto a wooden pallet frame

16Cut the timber

Use the drop saw to cut the edges of the 2 pieces of timber at 45-degrees.
A circular saw in position over a piece of timber ready for cutting

17Attach the tops of the bar

Place 1 of the side pieces in place. Pre-drill a hole using a 5.5mm bit and then countersink using a 16mm spade bit. Screw into place with the 75mm bugle screws. Repeat this to fix the other piece of timber to the top of the bar.
A Bunnings team member screwing a bar counter down onto a frame constructed from wooden pallets

18Putty the holes and joins

Use wood putty to fill the screw holes and any gaps in the joins at the top of the bar. Let the putty dry and sand it to create a smooth surface. Start with 40-grit sandpaper to flatten out the lumps and finish off with 240-grit sandpaper. Wipe away any dust.
Putty being used to fill the joints in a wooden pallet wine bar

19Varnish the top of the bar

You can paint or varnish your bar to suit your style. We used an exterior grade varnish so it can be left outside. You might need to apply several coats, so let each one dry before lightly sanding and applying the next coat. To personalise your bar, you can also add a drinks shelf by repeating the process of creating the bar top.
A timber bar counter being varnished

20Relax at your new bar

Your new pallet bar will look great in its place in your backyard or inside your home; and its rustic look will be a good conversation starter.
A completed wooden pallet wine bar in an outdoor entertaining area, with two bottles of beer, two wine glasses, and two bottles of Pellegrino

Inspiration from the Bunnings Workshop community

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.