D.I.Y. toddler activity board

Jess, Team member
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Project Overview

It’s great to give kids a reason to get outdoors and have fun and this easy-to-make chalkboard will do just that. It will have your kids playing outside and creating their own works of art in no time.
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paint roller
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How to paint with a roller

When you’re painting a ceiling with a roller, keep the end of the roller facing the side of the surface that you have already cut in. This will make sure that the roller’s metal frame doesn’t damage your walls.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Have your timber pre-cut
2 Attach plywood to the cement sheeting
3 Hammer the cement sheeting to the plywood.
4 Paint the chalkboard with primer
5 Apply the chalkboard paint
6 Attach the frame
7 Attach the shelf
8 Hang the chalkboard
  • Step 1. Have your timber pre-cut

    Once you’ve worked out where you want the chalkboard to go and how big it will be, have the timber pre-cut for you at Bunnings. It will make the job so much easier. Here’s our cutting list:

    85mm x 19mm x 1840mm x 3 for the top, bottom and ledge
    85mm x 19mm x 750mm x 3 for the divider and each end


  • Step 2. Attach plywood to the cement sheeting

    Because the chalkboard is going to be outside you want it to be hard-wearing. That’s why you need to attach the cement sheeting to the plywood. Apply glue to the plywood and have someone help you lift the cement board on top of it. Line it up so that the edges are flush. Press the cement board onto the plywood.

  • Step 3. Hammer the cement sheeting to the plywood.

    Measure the length of the chalkboard. Use masking tape to divide the board in half. Use a hammer and nails to secure the cement sheeting to the plywood.

  • Step 4. Paint the chalkboard with primer

    If you’re using a new paint brush or roller, soak it in water – this will help it hold the paint better. Next, stir the primer thoroughly. Read the instructions on the paint can and paint the first side of the chalkboard. Remove the masking tape. Let the paint dry, turn it over and paint the other side of the chalkboard and the edges.

  • Step 5. Apply the chalkboard paint

    Once the primer has dried, turn the board back over so the cement sheet is facing upwards. Use a roller to apply chalkboard paint to the cement sheet. You may need to apply two or three coats. 

  • Step 6. Attach the frame

    Lay out the pre-cut timber around the edges of the chalkboard. If you want, you can divide the chalkboard in half using another piece of timber. Clamp the timber to the frame. Use the nail gun to secure the outside frame to the chalkboard. Don’t nail the divider yet.

  • Step 7. Attach the shelf

    Create a shelf by using a nail gun to join two pieces of timber together at a 90° angle. Clamp the shelf to the chalkboard. Use the nail gun to secure the shelf to the board. Secure the divider to the chalkboard using the nail gun.

  • Step 8. Hang the chalkboard

    When choosing a place to hang the chalkboard, make sure it’s not too high or too low for your kids. Use screws to secure the chalkboard to the wall, making sure it’s square. Buy some chalk and let your kids’ imaginations run wild on their own chalkboard.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Bucket
  • Clamp
  • Gloves
  • Hammer
  • Measuring tape
  • Nail gun
  • Paint brush or roller and tray
  • Paint stirrer

Materials

  • 85mm x 19mm x 1840mm blackbutt timber x 3
  • 85mm x 19mm x 750mm blackbutt timber x 3
  • 1800mm x 900mm x 12mm CD ply
  • 1800mm x 900mm x 6mm cement sheet underlay
  • 10mm x 85mm screws x 6
  • Chalkboard paint
  • Liquid nails
  • Primer
  • Masking tape
  • Nails
  • Rags
  • Screws
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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