How to silicone a gap

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How to silicone a gap

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Project Overview

Silicone sealant is a great way to fill in gaps between tiles, shower screens, baths and sinks. It also stops water seeping in where you don’t want it. We’ll show you how to put silicone into a gap using a caulking gun. You will also see how to give your silicone a smooth, professional finish and clean up any excess.

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Finish silicone

To give silicone a smooth finish, some people use a bit of saliva on the end of their finger. Then six months later they wonder why their silicone has started to go mouldy. The bacteria in your mouth will happily grow in silicone, which creates those darks stains. To get a smooth finish that won’t discolour, use a wet rag dipped in fresh water instead.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Apply silicone sealant to the gap
2 Wipe off the excess silicone
  • Step 1. Apply silicone sealant to the gap

    To give the silicone the best bonding surface possible, clean and dry all your surfaces before you start. Then use the caulking gun to apply silicone to the gap, working smoothly and evenly. Don’t worry if it looks a bit rough, you can fix that in the next step
  • Step 2. Wipe off the excess silicone

    Use a damp rag over the tip of your finger to wipe along the newly sealed gap. This will wipe off any excess and push sealant further into the gap to help give you a neat finish. For tight corners, use a chisel to neaten the edge. Clean off any excess with the rag.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Caulking gun
  • Chisel
  • Sharp knife

Materials

  • Damp rag
  • Tube of silicone
  • 4

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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