What to plant in spring

Say goodbye to cold winter days and hello to the sun and warmth of spring. Now is the perfect time to get in the garden and start planting. But what to plant? Our spring planting guide has the answers.

With the weather getting warmer, spring is the perfect time to start planting flowers, fruit trees, vegetables and herbs. However, what you can grow also depends on the soil conditions and climate where you live. With a climate as diverse as Australia's, it's important to know which plants are best suited to your region so that you get the best results in your garden.

prepare your soil

Prepare your soil

Before you plant, prepare your soil by digging in compost and manure so your plants have the nutrients they need to grow. Also, make sure the soil is well watered. Then cover your garden beds in a 10cm layer of mulch to help retain the moisture.

SPRING COLOUR

Plant some spring colour

Australia is made up of six climatic zones and two main seasonal patterns, so depending on where you live you may be experiencing different weather conditions to other parts of the country. The following is a list of some of the more popular flowers to plant in spring:

Southern States (Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia) 

• Petunias 

• Snapdragons

• Marigolds 

Geraniums 


Queensland 

Gardenias

• Alyssum 

• Begonias 

• Cosmos 

• Marigolds 

• Petunias 


Western Australia 

• Marigolds

• Portulacas 

• Impatiens 

• Zinnias 

• Kangaroo Paw 


Tasmania 

• Hippeastrums 

• Belladonna Lilies

• Nerines 

Giant Sunflowers

Spring fruits, vegetables and herbs

Which fruits, vegetables and herbs you can plant and successfully grow in spring will depend on the climate in your region.

oranges

Warm areas

Areas that are frost-free or only have occasional frosts. This is the area north of Coffs Harbour in New South Wales and all the way across to Geraldton in the west.

Fruits and vegetables: 

• Passionfruit

• Paw paw 

• Avocado

• Banana 

• Citrus

• Macadamia 

• Rocket 

• Silverbeet 

• Spring onion

• Lettuce 

• Zucchini 

• Pumpkin 

• Leek 

• Capsicum 

• Cucumber 

• Eggplant 

• Tomatoes 

 

Herbs: 

• Parsley 

• Sweet basil

• Dill

• Mint 

• Marjoram

• Coriander 

• Catnip 

• Thyme

spinach

Cool to cold areas

Areas where there are low temperatures for long periods of time. This includes all of Tasmania, most of Victoria, the southern highlands of New South Wales, the ACT and a small part of the southern South Australia. 

Fruits and vegetables: 

• Strawberries 

• Leeks

• Onions

• Parsnip

• Radishes 

• Spinach 

• Sweet corn 

• Beetroot 

• Tomatoes

• Peas 

• Silverbeet

• Lettuce

• Swedes 

• Turnips

• Cucumber


Herbs: 

• Basil 

• Chives 

• Coriander 

• Dill 

• Mint 

• Oregano

• Parsley 

• Sage 

• Thyme 

raised garden bed

Temperate zones

Where there are occasional winter frosts, this includes much of the rest of Australia, some areas of Victoria, most of South Australia and the southern Western Australia.

Fruit and vegetables:

• Blueberries

• Passionfruit 

• Paw paw 

• Bananas 

• Citrus 

• Olives

• Spring onion

• Artichoke 

• Celery 

• Silverbeet 

• Lettuces 

• Leeks 

• Climbing beans 

• Sweet corn 

• Tomatoes 

• Carrots 

• Radishes


Herbs: 

• Chives 

• Parsley 

• Catnip

• Sage 

• Oregano

• Rosemary

• Thyme 

• Marjoram

Start your spring garden today

We’ve got everything you need to plant colour, fruit, vegies or herbs, and plenty of new ideas for your garden.

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Mulch

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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