How to make a worm farm

A worm farm can turn your organic waste into rich fertiliser to feed your garden. It’s also a fun and rewarding way to get the kids actively involved in the environment.

Why compost?

Almost half of the household waste we throw away is organic and therefore, ideal for composting. Yet so many of us throw it in the bin rather than recycling it. Problem is, organic waste releases methane as it breaks down in landfill, adding greenhouse gases to the environment. Recycling your organic waste with a worm farm is far more beneficial for both your garden and the environment.  

Get a wriggle on

The Reln Garden 2 Tier Can-O-Worms Composter makes it easy to set up your own worm farm at home. It comes with two trays, the bottom or ‘home’ tray is where your worms start. The top or ‘working’ tray is where your organic scraps go. The two tier system encourages the worms to move from the bottom tray to the top. A worm farm of this size can digest up to 4kg of food scraps a week. 

Worm farm

Put the pieces together

Start by setting up the ‘home’ tray and attach the legs, making sure you keep the cardboard packaging to line the bottom tray. Put the bedding block in a bucket of water and once it has expanded remove it, crumble it and spread across the cardboard. Then add your new pets – the worms!

Worm farm

A feeding frenzy

Add another tray, called the working tray. Fill it with kitchen scraps – everything from fruit and vegetable peelings to coffee grounds, dust, hair clippings, even torn up newspapers. Worms are excellent recyclers, devouring up to 3-4kg of kitchen waste weekly. They work best in the shade and dark. Lastly, add a hessian blanket for insulation.

Worm farm

Harvest your compost and liquid fertiliser

Being a worm farmer involves a little maintenance. Worms are thirsty workers, so they need hydration. Turn on the tap regularly to drain excess liquid. This is called worm tea, diluted with water it’s an excellent liquid fertiliser. When the trays are full, harvest the castings (or worm poop), a product that’s jam-packed with nutrients. Add it to your garden and your plants will grow like crazy.

Nature's recyclers

Worms are nature’s recyclers and great helpers in turning your food scraps into rich fertiliser for your garden. You can find everything you need to set up a worm farm at your local Bunnings

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
Top of the content