Discover 13 plants that are best for indoors

Striking foliage and stunning colour isn’t just reserved for the garden. There’s a wide variety of indoor plants you can use to bring colour and life to your home explains Bunnings Greenlife buyer Katrina Gatt.

Philodendron xanadu

Growing to a metre high, philodendrons (pictured above) are common indoor plants that are tolerant of low light levels. The distinctive foliage reveals their tropical origin. Water regularly, especially during warmer weather.

Orchid in pot

Phalaenopsis orchid (Phalaenopsis spp.)

Better than a bunch of flowers, orchids attractive flowers come in a wide range of colours and can last three months from bud. Position in a bright area but not in direct sunlight. Water weekly making sure excess water can drain.

peace lily plant

Peace lily (Spathiphyllum wallisii)

Growing to around 30cm high, the dark glossy foliage is complemented by delicate white flowers. The peace lily is suitable for low light positions; soil should be kept moist, so water thoroughly when it’s dry to touch.

Fiddle Fig in pot

Fiddle leaf fig (Ficus lyrata)

The fiddle-leaf-fig is a popular larger plant with violin-shaped leaves. Should be grown in a large pot in a well-lit area. Water regularly during growing season but allow the soil to dry out between drinks in cooler months.

Cyclament in pot

Cyclamen (Cyclamen persicum)

Decorative foliage with blooms in white, pink, or purple flowers during cooler months. Place cyclamens in well-lit areas but not direct sunlight. Water by filling a saucer under the pot to be drawn up by the plant.

Air plant in pot

Air plant (Tillandsia spp.)

Air plants foliage ranges from thin silvery wisps to fleshy leaves. They draw nutrients from moisture in the air so don’t need soil, making them a great plant for terrariums. Place in a bright spot out of direct sunlight.

Lucky Bamboo in pot

Lucky bamboo (Dracaena braunii)

These distinctive and often curly stems can grow up to a metre high. Very hardy and requiring little maintenance, the lucky bamboo can be grown in low light in just a vase of water with occasional fertilising. It can also be grown in potting mix if desired.

Anthurium in pot

Anthurium (Anthurium ambianum)

Broad green leaves and large red flowers are the main features of the anthurium. Grow in a bright spot with free draining potting mix. Water only when soil is dry to touch.

zanzubar gem plant

Zanzibar gem (Zammioculcas zamiifolia)

This is the ultimate low maintenance plant. Zanzibar gems tolerates low light levels and will go a long time without watering and still survive. It has long succulent stems and shiny, waxy leaves in a palm-like arrangement.

mother in laws tongue plant

Mother-in-law’s tongue (Sansevieria trifasciata)

Long, thin, succulent leaves grow between 50 and 120cm tall. This structural plant does best in bright to mid-light areas. Be cautious when watering mother-in-law's tongue, especially during winter as it prefers soil that is a little dry.

apidistra

Cast Iron Plant (Aspidistra elatior)

Aspidistra is almost indestructible and can tolerate low light conditions. It has broad dark green leaves that grow to 50cm long. Water regularly during summer and spring but less so during winter.

dragon tree

Red Edge Dracaena or Dragon Tree (Dracaena marginate)

This foliage plant looks fantastic all year round. Dragon trees tall thin stems are crowned with long slender leaves of various colours. Suitable for bright to mid-light positions, keep potting mix on the drier side but don’t let it dry out completely.

calathea plant

Calathea (Calathea spp.)

Colourful patterned foliage of pale green with dark green spots and lines make the calathea a very attractive small indoor plant. It grows best in mid-light and should be kept moist with regular watering in summer months.

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For all these and more indoor plants to brighten your home, have a look at our huge range of indoor plants and pots.

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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