D.I.Y. pallet herb planter

Peter, Team member
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Project Overview

It always tastes better cooking with fresh herbs grown in your own garden. We’ll show you how to recycle an old wooden pallet into a rustic herb planter, perfect for growing herbs in any outdoor space.
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Head of hammer removing nails from timber.
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How to remove a stuck nail

Sometimes a nail is stuck solidly in place and won’t pry out easily. A good way to deal with this is to pry up the surrounding timber and then push it back into place. This should leave the nail sitting above the timber. Then you can pull it out with the claw on your hammer.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Dismantle the pallet
2 Cut the wood to size
3 Assemble the framework
4 Put the base on the planter
5 Attach the feet
6 Attach the end posts
7 Line the planter
  • Step 1. Dismantle the pallet

    Make sure you get a pallet that has been heat treated so it will be safe for growing food. Use a pinch bar to lever the timber slats from the frame of the pallet. Use a hammer and pliers to remove any nails from the timber.

  • Step 2. Cut the wood to size

    Your herb planter can be any size you want. In this case, we had enough timber to make a top box, base box, legs, support posts and spacers. Before you cut the timber to size, use a tape measure, pencil and square to measure and mark it. Then use the drop saw to cut the timber to the following lengths:

    Top box
    90mm x 300mm (sides) x 2
    90mm x 750mm (front & back) x 2

    90mm x 750mm (base) x 3

    Base box
    145mm x 300mm (sides) x 2
    145mm x 750mm (front & back) x 2

    145mm x 750mm (base) x 2

    Legs
    90mm x 50mm x 300mm x 2

    Support posts
    90mm x 500mm x 2

    Spacers
    90mm x 150mm x 2 

  • Step 3. Assemble the framework

    Put on your ear muffs and safety glasses. Line the timber up so that the edges are flush. Then use the nail gun to join the four pieces of timber to make the rectangular frame for the herb planter.

  • Step 4. Put the base on the planter

    Line up your base pieces on the frame, making sure you leave a gap between the timber so that the soil drains well. Then use the nail gun to attach the timber to the frame of the planter. 

  • Step 5. Attach the feet

    The feet are important because they elevate the planter, help with drainage and keep the base dry so it doesn’t rot. The heavy rail from the pallet is perfect to use for the feet. Attach the feet to the base of the planter using the nail gun. 

  • Step 6. Attach the end posts

    Use the nail gun to fix the spacer to the end posts. Slide the end post onto each side of the planter, place the top box onto it and nail it into place. 

  • Step 7. Line the planter

    Line both the base of both herb planters with weed mat. Add the soil and plant your favourite herbs into your new herb planter.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Chisel
  • Drop saw
  • Dust mask
  • Earmuffs
  • Hammer
  • Handsaw
  • Measuring tape
  • Nail gun
  • Pencil
  • Pinch bar
  • Safety glasses
  • Set square

Materials

  • Herb pots
  • Mulch
  • Nails
  • Pallet
  • Screws
  • Weed mat
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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