Everything you ever needed to know about mulch

Using mulch is one of the best ways to grow and maintain a healthy garden. It protects plants, improves soil and encourages growth. Here’s everything you need to know to choose the right mulch for your garden.

What is Mulch?

Mulch is any material you use to cover the surface of your soil around plants. It keeps the moisture in, stops nutrients from washing away, maintains even soil temperature, and blocks out sunlight to prevent weed growth.

Types of Mulch

There are many different mulches, both organic and inorganic. Organic mulches include leaves, grass clippings, bark and straw. Being natural, they decompose over time to add nutrients to the soil but often need topping up. While inorganic mulches such as gravel, pebbles, black plastic, landscape fabrics and even old newspaper are longer lasting but don’t contribute directly to the soil.

Organic Mulches

You’ll find plenty of mulches on the market but you can also use natural garden wastes. Some work better than others do, so it’s important to know a bit about the different types to help you choose what’s best for your garden.

Straw is a great mulch for vegetable gardens. It decomposes quickly and improves the soil as it decays to help you grow a bumper crop of vegies.

Sugar Cane mulch is made from dried sugar cane leaves. It provides an attractive finish in garden beds that also encourages helpful soil organisms.

Pine bark is great for garden beds and pots. It’s dark natural colour blends in with the soil and looks great in any garden.

Coir is fibre from the outer husk of coconuts. A more decorative mulch, you can get it in concentrated blocks, which quickly expand when you add water.

Hard wood mulch is great for suppressing weeds. It looks good and takes a while to decompose so you don’t have to replace it as often.

Lucerne mulch has the added advantage of giving your soil extra nitrogen as it breaks down. It’s ideal for roses, flowers, vegetables and fruit trees.

Woodchips are not only great for mulch but also make an attractive feature in your garden. Putting down a 4–6cm layer provides good weed control.

Grass clippings are great for growing a lush green lawn. After mowing, it’s best to dry out your clippings and then add a 6cm layer over your lawn.

Leaves lying around in your garden can be gathered up and used as mulch. You should shred them first because whole leaves often blow away. 

Inorganic Mulches

While they don’t offer the same soil fertility as organic mulch, synthetic mulches are the best soil insulators because they don’t break down. They keep soil warmer for longer, promoting helpful bacteria and can sometimes extend the growth period of your plants. 

Gravel and pebbles are permanent and best used for foundation plants. They make an appealing design feature that you can enjoy year after year. 

Black plastic or weedmat is most effective as weed control. However, it can break down in sunlight so it’s best to bury the plastic under your soil so that it lasts longer. It’s also a good idea to cut out some holes for water drainage. 

Landscape fabrics work the same way as plastic but let air and water through better. For best results, add another 6-8cm of organic mulch over the top. 

Old newspaper can be recycled as mulch. Place it down in 10-page layers and throw on some organic mulch like straw to stop it blowing away. The newspaper keeps weeds down and makes the straw last longer.

dill

Planting & Growing Must-have herbs to help you cook up a storm Turn every meal into a gourmet affair with herbs from your own pot or patch. It’s easy to get started and gives endless rewards in both kitchen and garden.

How to control and eliminate garden pests organically

Planting & Growing How to control and eliminate garden pests organically Try controlling garden pests with these approaches from Eco Organic Garden.

Chilli Plant

Planting & Growing Growing chilli plant care guide Add a little fire to your food garden with a chilli plant. It’s not just a food plant, it can become a collectable obsession, too!

Cherry Plant

Planting & Growing How to plant and grow a cherry tree Sweet or sour, cherries are a popular summer treat around the world. Lovely and narrow, the cherry tree is suited to areas with cold winters, creating a stunning display of blossom in spring followed by the much-loved fruit.

Palm Tree

Planting & Growing How to grow and care for palm trees Nothing evokes a tropical island beach or desert oasis like a palm tree does. The coconut or date palms may be familiar to us all, but there is an abundance of palm trees, suitable for creating an exotic touch to our homes or gardens.

Bromeliad Plant

Planting & Growing Planting growing and propagating bromeliad in Australia Bromeliad offers stunning foliage, flowers that look like they’re from another planet, varieties to grow in almost any situation, and most are super hardy. What’s not to love?

Blueberry Plant

Planting & Growing How to grow blueberries Blueberries are nature’s superfoods, packed with antioxidants and filled with flavour. These pretty bushes make a wonderful dwarf hedge or in small gardens, try growing them in pots to enjoy flowers in spring and fresh berries throughout summer.

banana palm

Planting & Growing How to grow and care for banana trees Look after your banana tree, with our plant care guide. From ideal planting conditions to pests and diseases, our guide is the perfect starting place for garden enthusiasts.

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
Top of the content