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A table with several useful tools laid out on it

Overview

There are some tools everyone needs for home handy work. We’ll show you the basic safety equipment, hand and power tools you need for all kinds of jobs around the house. Plus, we’ll get a few suggestions for more advanced tools for your kit.

Steps

1Safety equipment for your tool box

When you're doing D.I.Y. jobs around the home, the most important thing is safety. So make sure your tool box has safety glasses and ear muffs. It's also worth having a pair of leather gloves to protect your hands from blades and splinters.

A table with several useful tools laid out on it

2Basic hand tools for your tool box

The hammer is a great general purpose tool - it's good for nailing, knocking and pulling. Add in a wrecking bar, handsaw, measuring tape and pencil, and you've got most basic building jobs covered. For taking apart and putting back together, include a set of screwdrivers, pair of pliers, adjustable wrench, shifting spanner and pair of clamps. Finally, put in a caulking gun for basic gluing and applying silicone sealant.
A pencil and tape measure

3Power tools for your tool box

The drill is one of the most useful power tools you can have. If you decide to get a battery-powered one, choose long-life lithium batteries. Some brands have interchangeable batteries that you can swap with other tools like an impact driver and circular saw. It's also worth getting a few different driver bits for flat head, hex head and Phillips head screws.

Several power drills

4Spirit level and a tool bag

A spirit level is very useful for a lot of building jobs. It is also great to have around for basic jobs like making sure your picture frames are straight and your fridge is sitting level. You should also get yourself a tool bag to store and carry everything around
A heavy duty storage bag for tools

5Other tools you might need

Once you get beyond the basic jobs, there are a few other tools to consider. A hacksaw is great for cutting metal, plastic, screws and nails. Chisels, a nail punch and a combination mitre square are helpful for carpentry. A utility knife is always useful for trimming jobs and a file is great for taking rough edges off metal. Finally, if you are working with nuts and bolts, get some open ended spanners or a socket set.

A square rule, saw, chisels, spanners and boxcutter

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.