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A person attaching metal cross bracing diagonally across rafters

Overview

After you've built your carport, you need to brace it. This will stop it from moving and also keep it square. This simple to follow guide shows you the tools you need for the project and how to measure and install the bracing.

Steps

1Measure the carport

Stand on the ladder and with help from someone else, measure the distance from one corner of the carport to the one diagonally opposite it. Repeat this for the other corners. If the distances are the same, your carport is square. To keep it square, nail a long piece of timber from the top of the post at the front of the carport to the bottom of the post diagonally opposite it. This timber will act as a brace.

Person measuring a car port.

2Attach the hoop iron

Cut the hoop iron to the distance you measured from one corner of the carport to the one diagonally opposite it. Standing on the ladder, nail in one end of the hoop iron in one corner of the carport, using the galvanised nails with the flat head. Roll-out the hoop rail diagonally across the carport, so that it sits above the rafters. Wearing your safety gloves, pull the hoop rail tight. Nail it into the post. Nail the hoop iron into each rafter, with two nails in each rafter.
Person hammering a hoop iron to a carport frame.

3Attach the second hoop rail

Repeat the above step to attach the second hoop iron from one corner of the carport to the other. It's important to make sure the hoop iron is pulled tight before you nail in the second set of nails. After you've attached the two hoop irons, use the hammer to remove the piece of timber nailed to the front of the carport.
A person attaching metal cross bracing diagonally across rafters

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More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.