How to paint tiles

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How to paint tiles

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A fresh lick of paint is a great way to save money and transform your old wall tiles. Tile paint is specifically designed to paint over glass, porcelain and ceramic tiles. And unlike normal paint it won’t flake off over time. All it takes is a small amount of preparation and your tiled area will be looking brand new.

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1. Clean and sand the surface of the tiles

Start by preparing your surfaces, which means giving your tiles a good clean with a tile-cleaning product. Once the surface is dry, give the tiles a light sand to score the surface. This will help take the glaze off the surface of the tiles and help the paint to bond better to the surface. Once the surface is sanded, wipe away the dust.

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2. Mask up the edges

Now you’re ready to mask off the edges with tape. Make sure you use long runs of tape to give you a straighter edge. When the masking is done, give the tiles another quick wipe with a rag to clear off all the dust – just to make sure the paint will stick.

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3. Prime the surface of the tiles with tile primer

The best way to prime the surface is by using both a paintbrush and a roller. The brush allows you to paint up to the edges or ‘cut in’, while the roller can cover large surfaces quickly. When the primer has dried, and had time to cure (refer to the instructions), give it a very light sand. Then wipe off the dust and you’re ready to paint.

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4. Paint the tiles with tile paint

Stir your paint thoroughly and then pour half of the tile paint it into a clean working pot. Starting in the top corner, work your brush down the tiles to create a wet edge. Then work your way across the wall, maintaining that wet edge as you go. This way you can avoid any overlapping brush marks.

Ready to paint

To freshen up your home, check out our wide range of painting products and get a professional finish with our great ideas and handy tips.

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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