Project Overview

You can keep all your bikes and cycling gear together with this simple D.I.Y. multiple bike rack. We’ll show you how to make a rack for storing all kinds of bikes, scooters, helmets and bike pumps. Continue to step-by-step instructions
How to lubricate difficult screws with soap
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How to lubricate difficult screws with soap

We’ve all had times when we just can’t get a screw into a piece of wood. Here’s a simple tip to make the job easier. Take a bar of soap and run the side of the screw along it, so that the grooves are covered in soap. Put the screw back into the hole and you should now find driving the screw into the wood much easier.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Have your timber pre-cut
2 Lay-out the base frame
3 Secure the base frame
4 Lay-out and build the top frame
5 Attach the mid-rail
6 Attach the pegboard
7 Measure and mark for the galvanised pipes
8 Drill the holes for the pipes
9 Screw in the pipes
10 Join the two frames
11 Secure the support beam to the frame
12 Sand and paint the bike rack
  • Step 1. Have your timber pre-cut

    You can make your bike rack to suit how many bikes and cycling gear you need to store. We had our timber pre-cut at Bunnings to these lengths:

    45mm x 90mm x 820mm pine x 6
    45mm x 90mm x 1000mm pine x 2
    45mm x 90mm x 625mm pine x 2

  • Step 2. Lay-out the base frame

    The main components of the bike rack are the two pine frames, which are held together with bugle bolts and two brackets. To build the base frame, take two 820mm pieces of pine and lay them horizontally on a flat surface. Lay the two shorter 625mm pieces between these for the sides to create a rectangular-shaped frame. Make sure all the corners are square.
  • Step 3. Secure the base frame

    With your base frame square, use the 9mm drill bit to pre-drill through the 625mm timbers into the longer timbers. Use two bugle 125mm screws in each corner to secure the base frame together.

  • Step 4. Lay-out and build the top frame

    Simply repeat the previous two steps to make the top frame. Build a rectangle out of the two lengths of timber. Using the same 9mm bit, pre-drill through the longer timbers into the shorter timbers. Secure the frame with 2 x 125mm bugle screws in each corner.

  • Step 5. Attach the mid-rail

    Next you need to make a mid-rail, which will be used to attach the peg board. Measure the height of the pegboard, ours was 445mm. Then transfer these measurements to the longer side vertical timber on the top frame. These marks are the fixing point for the mid-rail. Put the mid-rail in position, make sure it’s square and use the 125mm bugle screws to screw it into place.

  • Step 6. Attach the pegboard

    Lay the peg board on the top frame, make sure it’s flush with the top of the frame and the mid-rail. Use the 20mm screws to attach the peg board to the frame. Don’t worry if the board burrs where you insert the screws, these can be sanded back later. 

  • Step 7. Measure and mark for the galvanised pipes

    The galvanised pipes are what will hold the front wheels of your bike, so make sure you space them the right distance apart. Place the top piece of 625mm timber onto the bottom frame and measure and mark out where you want the pipes to go. Mark a quarter of the way in (205mm) and three quarters (615mm) of the way in. Transfer these measurements onto the bottom frame with your pencil and T-square.

  • Step 8. Drill the holes for the pipes

    Use the 20mm spade bit to drill four holes for the galvanised pipes. Make sure you drill them on an angle so the galvanised pipe line up with the holes in the timber on the base. Only drill deep enough to cover the thread on the pipe.
  • Step 9. Screw in the pipes

    Insert the galvanised pipes into the holes in the base of the frame. Then insert them into the holes that will be attached to the top frame. You may need to make your holes a little deeper if this piece of timber does not fit into place properly.
  • Step 10. Join the two frames

    Stand the bottom frame upright and slide the top frame next to it. Make sure the frames are square and then screw in the two brackets to join them together.
  • Step 11. Secure the support beam to the frame

    Secure the top piece of timber with the galvanised pipes. Tap this beam into place and measure to make sure that it’s flush and square. Screw it into place with 2 x 125mm bugle screws on each side.
  • Step 12. Sand and paint the bike rack

    Now the bike rack is built, sand it using 120 grit sandpaper. You can then paint it the colour of your choice. Now it’s in place, it looks great and is keeping the kids bikes neat and tidy.
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint Test.
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