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Fix strips being attached to a wooden frame with nails and a hammer

Overview

A shade cloth in the garden is a great to protect your plants from the summer heat. We'll show you how to attach shade cloth to a frame over your garden beds.

Steps

1Attach fix strips to the top of the frame

Nail the fix strips to the top of the shade frame, making sure they're not too close to the edge, so that you don't split your timber. Make sure the nails on the strips are facing outwards. When you stretch the shade cloth over the frame, these will hold it in place. Use butt joins to make sure the fix strips are flush against each other. Continue this process all the way around the frame.

Fix strips being attached to a wooden frame with nails and a hammer

2Cut the end strips to size

When you get to the ends, you'll probably not have enough space left for a whole strip. Just use your tin snips to cut the strips to size.

A Bunnings team member cutting a fix strip to size with tin snips

3Spread the shade cloth over the frame

Roll out the shade cloth. Set up two ladders at one end. Stretch the cloth over the first end. Make sure its sitting evenly across the end with some excess on either side.
A shade cloth being stretched out over a wooden frame by a Bunnings team member on a ladder

4Stretch the cloth over the fix strips and hammer them down

Put some tension on the cloth and stretch it sideways and lengthways to make sure it is nice and taught. The fix strips hooks should be pushing through. Nail them down with a hammer.

A shade cloth being nailed into place over a wooden frame by a Bunnings team member on a ladder

5Work your way along the frame

Work your way from one end of the frame to the other along the length. Pull the shade cloth towards you and also lift it and bring it forward with you. This creates great tension at the back and keeps the cloth nice and tight. When you get to the ends, pull the shade tight lengthways and sideways, and nail them down.
A shade cloth being stretched out over a wooden frame by a Bunnings team member on a ladder

6Trim the edges

Trim the edges of the shade to the edges of the beams so you can't see anything from the ground. Follow all the edges around making sure not to cut too close to your nails.
Excess shade cloth being trimmed from a wooden frame by a Bunnings team member on a ladder

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More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.