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A heavy duty flashlight with large battery, scissors, facemask, first aid kit and Swiss army tool

Overview

If an earthquake hits, it’s important to have a kit pre-prepared and ready to go at a moment’s notice. You should also consider having an emergency plan as well. We’ll show you some things to pack depending on your family members, and some ideas on how to store it. Also remember to check it regularly and keep it updated.

Steps

1Pack the right amount of food and water

When creating an earthquake kit, pack three days worth of food and drinkable water for each member in your family. Non perishable food such as tinned food is ideal. Three litres per person per day is the recommended amount of drinking water, which can be held in a water bladder or plastic bottles. Also include cooking appliances and a burner to cook your food or boil water.

Various things that belong in an earthquake kit, including bottled water, rope, a first aid kit, flashlight, Swiss army tool, sealable bag and more

2Some tools you'll need

You may be without power for days so there are a few essential tools you'll need when packing a kit. A multi-tool, a torch and battery will come in handy, as well as a radio to keep in touch with what is happening in your area. Also pack some rope and some kind of cutting tool with like a knife or scissors
A heavy duty flashlight with large battery, scissors, facemask, first aid kit and Swiss army tool

3Pack for all your family members

Make sure you have warm clothing for everyone. You should also include wet weather gear such as a poncho and an emergency blanket. A fully stocked First Aid Kit will also help you deal with anything you may encounter.
A first aid kit containing Band-Aids, cleansing wipes and other dressings, along with a battery, scissors, Swiss army tool, blanket and more

4Store everything in a handy kit

Assemble your kit together in something accessible that you can grab at a moment's notice. A backpack or waterproof container are good ways to keep everything together.

A lid being placed over a black tub with emergency equipment inside

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More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.