Bunnings logo with a piece of holly.
Icon - Website - Mobile - Add to project list.svgIcon - Website - Mobile - Cart.svg

Sign in to your account

Project list

Sign in to your account

Close up of a Bunnings team member to pry up a floorboard using a crowbar

Overview

Sometimes you want to keep old floorboards when you remove them. We show you how to lift up your old boards so you can use them again. You'll also see what tools you can use to make the job a little easier.

Steps

1Cut into one board

Sweep your floor to get rid of any loose dirt. Set the depth of your circular saw to 20mm, which is the standard depth of a floorboard.  Floorboards are usually nailed onto each joist with two nails. Cut two parallel lines along the length of your floorboard that run inside the line of those two nails.
Bunnings team member using a circular saw to cut into floorboards

2Remove the cut floorboard

Gently hammer a chisel into one of the saw cuts. Then use a chisel to pry out the centre piece. Once the centre is removed, chisel away at the sides of the cut board until they come away from the nails. This allows you to gently ease the sides away from the other boards and hammer the exposed nails back into the joists.
Close up of a person hammering a chisel in between two floorboards

3Lift the remaining boards up with a wrecking bar.

Use a wrecking bar to pry your boards up. Lean the bar against the joist for support. Place the blade of the wrecking bar under the board slightly away from the joist. Then gently lever the board up in stages. Once the board has come up a bit, place the blade in between the two nails on the joist and, using the joist for leverage, pry the board until you hear the nail pop and the board comes off.
Close up of a Bunnings team member to pry up a floorboard using a crowbar

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Asbestos, lead-based paints and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber are health hazards you need to look out for when renovating older homes. These substances can easily be disturbed when renovating and exposure to them can cause a range of life-threatening diseases and conditions including cancer. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page.

When following our advice in our D.I.Y. videos, make sure you use all equipment, including PPE, safely by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Check that the equipment is suitable for the task and that PPE fits properly. If you are unsure, hire an expert to do the job or talk to a Bunnings Team Member.