How to seal timber floors

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How to seal timber floors

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Project Overview

Sealing a timber floor helps preserve and highlight the beauty of the timber. It also makes it a lot easier to clean. We’ll show you how to seal the floor with a lambswool applicator. You’ll also see how using a paint brush makes it easier to seal around the edges. 
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This D.I.Y. Advice is part of a series How To Sand and Seal Timber Floors
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Done in a Day

You'll need to set aside a day to comfortably complete this project

 
Seal timber floor
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Wear socks when sealing your floor

When you are working on a raw timber floor, it is a good idea to just wear socks when you enter the room. This keeps the dirt to a minimum and reduces the chance of dirty footprints on the unsealed timber.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Seal the edges and corners of the timber floor
2 Seal the rest of the timber floor
  • Step 1. Seal the edges and corners of the timber floor

    Start by stirring your sealant thoroughly. Then carefully paint in the corners and edges of the floor with a paint brush. This is called “cutting in”. A good idea is to cut in about 100mm from the edge. This allows you to do the rest of the floor quickly without getting sealant on the walls or skirting boards.
  • Step 2. Seal the rest of the timber floor

    Now use the lambswool applicator to apply sealant to the rest of the floor. Start in a far corner and work your way towards a doorway. Once you are done, let it dry before doing a second coat. Drying times are normally on the side of your tin. Sometimes, a light hand sand between coats can help to keep the timber feeling smooth.

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint Test.
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