How to build a garden archway

John
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How to build a garden archway

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Project Overview

A garden arch is a great way to separate sections in your garden and create a feature to train plants on. Whether it’s for roses or climbers, make sure you choose the right arch for the plants you want to train. We’ll show you how to connect the garden arch together and secure it properly into place.

Continue to step-by-step instructions

Step by Step Instructions

1 Measure up where your archway will go
2 Connect the top arch
3 Connect the side panels to the top arch
4 Peg the arch into place
  • Step 1. Measure up where your archway will go

    Make sure you have room for where your archway will go. Use a tape measure to mark out the space – you may have to clear some plants or debris to make room.
  • Step 2. Connect the top arch

    Always follow the instructions supplied with your archway. Start by connecting the top arch pieces together with nuts and bolts, which can be tightened with spanners or a shifter.

  • Step 3. Connect the side panels to the top arch

    Now you’re ready to connect the side panels to the top arch to create your arch framework. Use a few nuts and bolts, and tighten with spanners or a shifter. It’s important to make sure it’s tight and secure or your archway will be unstable.
  • Step 4. Peg the arch into place

    Put the arch into the place where you want it to stand. Then peg it into the ground at each corner of the base to secure it in place. 

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Hammer
  • Measuring tape
  • Spanners

Materials

  • Garden archway accessories
  • 3

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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