How to create a weather station

Morgan
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How to create a weather station

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Project Overview

If you want to know the weather in your local area, we’ll show you how to make a D.I.Y. weather station. We’ll take you through the various ways to monitor the rain, temperature, air pressure, wind speed and humidity in your own backyard.

Continue to step-by-step instructions

Step by Step Instructions

1 Choose the right location
2 Installing a digital weather unit
3 Measuring rainfall
4 Choose a thermometer
  • Step 1. Choose the right location

    Where you place your weather station is the key. The right position means it can more accurately measure the rainfall, temperature and wind speed. It’s a good idea to place it inside a weather-box to prevent the sunlight and the wind from affecting the readings.

  • Step 2. Installing a digital weather unit

    If you have a digital all-in-one wireless weather unit, mount the indoor panel close to the external unit so it can work. You also want to keep it away from any TVs or antennas that may cause interference. The mounted unit outside your home wirelessly transmits data to the panel indoors. You can find out the wind direction and speed, rainfall, humidity, moon phases, the barometric pressure forecast and indoor and outdoor temperatures. 
  • Step 3. Measuring rainfall

    You can measure rainfall either with a rain gauge or a digital unit. A rain gauge collects water and has markings on the side to tell you how much rain has fallen. The digital unit will measure rainfall hourly, daily and weekly and stores the rain fall history. 

  • Step 4. Choose a thermometer

    There are several different types of thermometers you can use to measure the temperature. Both digital and traditional types can be mounted on an outside wall for an accurate reading. Some thermometers can even tell you the maximum and minimum temperature over a given period of time.

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint Test.
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