How to choose and maintain decking for a beach house

Steve, Team Member
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Project Overview

An outdoor deck can be a great addition to your home, so it’s important to choose the right material and finish you want. The local weather conditions, the cost and how easy it is to maintain may influence your decision. We’ll show you some different varieties of decking, as well as some finishes and how to maintain your decking so it looks great and lasts a long time.

Continue to step-by-step instructions

Step by Step Instructions

1 Treated pine decking
2 Hardwood timber decking
3 Composite decking
4 Clean your decking
5 Apply mould remover
6 Applying a lacquer
7 Applying a deck oil
8 Decking maintenance
9 Keep the deck clean
  • Step 1. Treated pine decking

    Treated pine is a popular choice for decking. It’s easy to work with and can also be painted or stained to the colour of your choice. Treated pine is termite and rot resistant and if it’s well maintained can last for 15-20 years. 

  • Step 2. Hardwood timber decking

    Hardwood decking requires less maintenance than softwood and is much more durable and hard-wearing. It can be sanded down and resealed so it’s less likely to mark or scratch. It’s also a good choice if your decking will get lots of direct sun and experience high temperatures.

  • Step 3. Composite decking

    Composite decking is a popular, environmentally friendly alternative to natural wood. It’s weather and stain resistant, lightweight and will last a long time. Made from recycled plastics and timber fibres, it won’t rot or splinter like timber, which makes it a very low-maintenance option. However composite decking retains heat, so avoid using it in an area in direct or full-sun.

  • Step 4. Clean your decking

    You should clean your decking before staining or painting it. Use a cleansing agent to remove the dirt and grime and bring it back to its natural colour. It will also revitalise the colour if the deck has greyed from sun exposure.

  • Step 5. Apply mould remover

    Even a clean deck will have mould spores in the timber. Use a specialist mould remover to clean your deck and kill the mould. After applying the mould remover, leave the decking to dry for at least two days before painting or staining it.

  • Step 6. Applying a lacquer

    Applying a lacquer to your decking will look good, but can take longer to apply because you need to use a paint brush. Even if you use a roller to apply the lacquer, you still need to go over it with a paint brush for a great finish.

  • Step 7. Applying a deck oil

    It’s easy to apply decking oil with a lamb’s wool applicator and the specially designed deck hand bucket. Pour the deck oil into the bucket, dip the applicator into the oil, wipe off the excess oil and brush it onto the decking. There are oil or water based products to suit your needs. 

  • Step 8. Decking maintenance

    Over time, wooden decking can move, dry or shrink which will cause nails to stick out. Regularly inspect your decking and hammer in any nails that are sticking out of the wood. Also, lightly sand back any rough patches of decking. 

  • Step 9. Keep the deck clean

    To make sure your deck lasts a long time, look after it by keeping it clean. You can sweep it with a scrubbing brush or use a high pressure water cleaner to get rid of any ingrained dirt and stains.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Broom
  • Deck hand bucket
  • Hammer
  • High-pressure cleaner
  • Paint brush
  • Paint roller tray

Materials

  • Deck cleaner
  • Decking oil
  • Lamb’s wool applicator
  • Mould preventer
  • Sandpaper
  • Varnish
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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