How to install roman blinds

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How to install roman blinds

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Project Overview

Roman blinds are a stylish and effective form of window dressing. They’re easy to install and look great in any room. They also improve your home’s privacy and insulation because they’re great at blocking light, sound and heat. This video shows you everything you need to know in order to install them.
Continue to step-by-step instructions

Step by Step Instructions

1 Measure the window cavity
2 Install the brackets in the window cavity
3 Hang the blind in the cavity
  • Step 1. Measure the window cavity

    Measure your window cavity so you know what area the blind needs to cover. Roman blinds can be trimmed to measure. It’s also possible to buy them in standard sizes. Your blind should have a width that is 60mm less than the width of the cavity to give you 30mm clearance on each side of the blind. It should also be 15mm to 30mm longer than the height of your cavity.
  • Step 2. Install the brackets in the window cavity

    Mark out the points where you will mount the brackets for your blind and pre-drill the screw holes. Make sure you choose a point that is far enough away from the surface of the glass to leave room for the blind to gather when you pull it up. Then screw your brackets into place. Don’t forget that roman blinds can be heavy, so consider adding in an extra bracket.
  • Step 3. Hang the blind in the cavity

    Clip the blind onto the brackets one bracket at a time. Start with a central bracket and work your way out. Once the blind is securely in place, the only thing left to do is install a cleat to hold the blind cord off the floor. Blinds cords can be a choking hazard, so it’s a good idea to tie them up out of reach of children. Screw a cleat onto the inside frame of the window approximately 1600mm off the floor and then tie your blind cord up.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Ear muffs
  • Impact driver
  • Ladder
  • Measuring tape
  • Pencil
  • Power drill
  • Ruler
  • Safety glasses
  • Scissors
  • Trimming knife
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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