How to stay safe when welding with gas

When it comes to welding with gas, be conscious that you’re dealing with a product that needs to be treated with care. The team at Coregas share their top tips on how to do this—whether it’s transporting your cylinders or setting up for the weld.

In transit

When transporting your gas cylinders, don’t put them in a car, four-wheel drive or station wagon. Instead use a well-ventilated trailer or truck.

Always transport gas cylinders in an upright position. Be sure they are well secured and won’t move in transit. When moving cylinders, never roll them.

Remember that all gases in cylinders are compressed, and so the physical impact of pressure release can lead to injuries or other dangers.

Storing your cylinders

Gas cylinders should always be stored in a well-ventilated area, ideally outside in a lock-up cage but with some overhead protection. Store cylinders on a level floor made from solid, non-combustible materials.

When being stored, gas cylinders should always be retained. Secure them using a racking system or use a non-abrasive coated chain that will not scratch the cylinder. Never store objects on top of gas cylinders.

The set up for weld

When welding with gas, always connect and use the right tools and equipment. Never use faulty equipment. Always test for leaks before starting on the weld. Don’t expose gas cylinders to artificial forms of heat. For example, a cutting torch, metal grinding or welding arc strikes.

Never use oil or grease on gas equipment and particularly near oxygen because the reaction may cause an explosion.

The welding operation

Personal protective gear is a must for any welder. Wear the right safety gear. For example, if you’re oxy-acetylene welding use the specified safety glasses. For MIG and TIG welding wear the appropriate welding shield. Wear leather gloves, overalls and safety boots.

Always weld on a surface that’s non-flammable such as a metal workbench. Work in a well-ventilated area.

Remember that all flammable gases will burn or may explode when exposed to open flames. Always have the appropriate fire extinguisher handy.

Get your gas

Check out the full Coregas range available at your local Bunnings.

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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