How to protect your garden against bushfires

Nadine
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Project Overview

When living in a bushfire prone area, it’s important to minimize the risk of the fire coming towards your house. We’ll give you a few simple tips to help, such as spacing out your plants in garden beds, making sure your garden is watered or using open, wide leaf plants like yuccas and ferns that will reduce the density around your house.

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This D.I.Y. Advice is part of a series How To Prepare for a Bushfire
block down pipe
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00:09
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A simple tip to block your downpipe

If you need to block your downpipes due to a bushfire threat, but you don’t have a plug, you can use a tennis ball or a damp t-shirt to block them.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Reduce your ground cover
2 Create firebreaks in your garden
3 Keep window areas free of plants
4 Use pot plants around your home
  • Step 1. Reduce your ground cover

    Remove any excess mulch or loose-leaf cover around the bottom of plants in your garden. This can easily fuel fires. Consider using crushed rock or gravel around your plants instead.

  • Step 2. Create firebreaks in your garden

    Paths are a great way to create a barrier and a defendable space in your garden. Replace any timber edging around your garden beds with stone or brick edging to reduce potential fire fuel. Even lawn can be an effective barrier between dense garden beds.

  • Step 3. Keep window areas free of plants

    Try keeping plants away from house windows. This means avoiding things such as planter boxes. A stone path around your house is the ideal width to keep clear of plants. 

  • Step 4. Use pot plants around your home

    Planting in pots is a great way to keep some greenery near your home during winter, but then allowing you to move them away from your house and into your garden in the summer months. 

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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