How to prepare an earthquake kit

Morgan
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How to prepare an earthquake kit

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Project Overview

If an earthquake hits, it’s important to have a kit pre-prepared and ready to go at a moment’s notice. You should also consider having an emergency plan as well. We’ll show you some things to pack depending on your family members, and some ideas on how to store it. Also remember to check it regularly and keep it updated.

Continue to step-by-step instructions

Step by Step Instructions

1 Pack the right amount of food and water
2 Some tools you’ll need
3 Pack for all your family members
4 Store everything in a handy kit
  • Step 1. Pack the right amount of food and water

    When creating an earthquake kit, pack three days worth of food and drinkable water for each member in your family. Non perishable food such as tinned food is ideal. Three litres per person per day is the recommended amount of drinking water, which can be held in a water bladder or plastic bottles. Also include cooking appliances and a burner to cook your food or boil water.

  • Step 2. Some tools you’ll need

    You may be without power for days so there are a few essential tools you’ll need when packing a kit. A multi-tool, a torch and battery will come in handy, as well as a radio to keep in touch with what is happening in your area. Also pack some rope and some kind of cutting tool with like a knife or scissors
  • Step 3. Pack for all your family members

    Make sure you have warm clothing for everyone. You should also include wet weather gear such as a poncho and an emergency blanket. A fully stocked First Aid Kit will also help you deal with anything you may encounter.
  • Step 4. Store everything in a handy kit

    Assemble your kit together in something accessible that you can grab at a moment’s notice. A backpack or waterproof container are good ways to keep everything together.

Tools and Materials

Materials

  • Blanket
  • Clothes
  • Cooking appliances
  • Drinking water
  • First Aid Kit
  • Gas burner
  • Medication
  • Multi tool
  • Non-perishable food
  • Pet food
  • Poncho
  • Radio and battery
  • Rope
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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