What to do in the garden in May

There are plenty of things that you can do in the garden in May before the rain and frosty mornings begin.

What to Do

May is a great time to get stuck into your weeding while the soil is soft and they’re easy to pull out. A good all-purpose weed killer will help you keep them under control easily.

It’s also time to consider how often you water your garden. Check your soil moisture to see if it needs any water at all. A deep slow watering a couple of times a week may be all that is needed.

A good idea is to top up mulch levels in your garden beds, vegie patches and herb gardens. This will help you to keep the weeds down. You could also add a liquid fertiliser to promote some winter growth, especially for your seedlings.

When mowing your lawn in May, cut it a little longer than usual. It will help the lawn cope better with the cooler conditions.

You may also want to start pruning your plants and trees and giving them a general tidy-up. Most plants will be dormant at this time and you’ll be able to improve their shape and maintain their health. Remove any dead, diseased or crossing branches as well as any that are growing in the wrong direction.

What to Plant

May is your last chance to get winter vegies and plants into your garden before they’re ready to harvest or bloom in spring.

In warm areas, May is the month to plant potatoes, sweet potatoes, leeks, beetroot, celery, lettuce, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, turnips, onions, kale, kohlrabi, spring onions, spinach and silverbeet. You could also plant herbs like lemongrass, chamomile, thyme, mint and rosemary.

In temperate climates, winter vegies like Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, radishes, swedes, turnips, spinach and broccoli are ready for planting. Companion plants like cornflower, calendula, dianthus, pansies, viola, snapdragons, ageratum and marigolds will add colour and attract insects.

In colder regions, the vegies that can go into the ground include broccoli, cabbage, artichoke, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, radishes, swedes, turnips and spinach. Sage is a great companion for these vegies to attract pests. For a little colour, trying planting cornflower, pansies, viola, verbena and lupins.

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