What to do in the garden in June

As tempting as it may be to stay warm inside during winter, your garden still needs some attention. Planting fruit, vegies and herbs now means you can look forward to a big harvest later in the year.

What to plant

June is a good month to top up your mulch, add liquid fertiliser and get some winter fruit and vegies into the garden.

If you live in a tropical area now is the time to plant leeks, rocket, beetroot, celery, lettuce broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, onions, spinach, silverbeet and sweet potato. For something sweet, plant strawberries rockmelon, kiwi fruit and figs. If you’re after herbs, go for basil, garlic, ginger, sage, oregano, rosemary, marjoram, chives and coriander. Marigolds, lupins, pansies and violas will brighten up your garden.

In sub-tropical areas you can start planting beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, peas, lettuce, rocket and snow peas. When it comes to herbs you can plant chicory and garlic. For a splash of colour go with marigolds, lupins, pansies and violas.

In temperate climates, it’s time for Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, peas, beans, radish, turnips, swedes and strawberries. For herbs, there’s garlic, chamomile, lemon grass, mint and lemon balm. And to attract pollinators like bees, plant cornflower, calendula, pansies, matthiola, viola and snapdragons.

In colder regions, you can start planting, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, peas, beans, turnips and rhubarb crowns. Planting sage among these will help repel caterpillars and moths. Dianthus, cornflower, pansy, verbena, and lupins will add some colour to your garden.

What to pick

June is all about citrus fruit, so mandarins, oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit are ready to pick. There’s also pink lady apples, while in warmer parts of the country tomatoes, bananas and melons are ripe and ready. When it comes to vegies, cabbage, cauliflower, onions, potatoes, pumpkin and spinach are all in season.

What to do

Winter is the time to feed your growing bulbs with a seaweed fertiliser or a low-environmental impact liquid fertiliser, it will give them a real kickstart. Don’t forget to give your fruit trees a feed as well.

When your azalea buds start showing some colour, spray them with fungicide, this will protect them against petal blight.

Heavy rain may have washed away some mulch, so now is the time to top it up in your vegie patches, herb gardens and ornamental beds. Mulching is a good way to stop weeds as well as keeping in moisture. When applying mulch, make sure you keep it away from plant stems, especially young seedlings. It’s also best to mulch after you’ve watered.

If you still need to water your garden, do it first thing in the morning. But check the moisture level of your soil before turning on your tap or reticulation.

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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