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How to choose drought tolerant plants

It’s easy to think planting for drought is just a matter of planting a garden full of “set and forget” Australian plants. But if you really want to be waterwise in your garden design, there are a number of other things to consider when choosing drought tolerant plants.

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Where Are You Planting?

What you choose depends on your local climate and soil type. Knowing how hot (and cold) it gets around your place can help define what sorts of plants are more likely to survive a drought your garden. The types of soils you have with can also make a big difference. Some plants thrive in light, sandy soils that drain well but can’t hold water or nutrients. Others love the heavy clay soils that hold water near the roots. There are some plants that can only cope in a perfect loamy soil that doesn’t drain too fast or too slow.

If you’re unsure of what type of soil you’ve got, dig up a sample and take it in to the nursery with you.

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Native Plants

Australian plants provide some great options for every type of weather condition. Thanks to the breeding of commercial nurseries, we’re long past the days where our natives look out of place in a domestic garden. The trick is to not only choose plants that are right for your soil conditions and climate, but that also fit in with your garden design. To get a good balance, mix up small trees like callistemon with screening shrubs like wooly bush, ornamentals like kangaroo paw and ground covers like dampiera.

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Local Natives

It makes sense that the plants native to your area will be best suited to your area’s conditions and soils. Your local nursery can be a great place to find out more. It’s also worth searching online for “indigenous plants” for your local area.

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Exotic Species

Just because plants come from overseas doesn’t mean they can’t cope with our conditions. Certain areas of the Mediterranean, California, Mexico and South Africa have climates very similar to ours. The best test for what works is to look at what has worked before. Take a look around at your neighbours’ gardens. Maybe pop your head over the fence and ask a few questions.

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Feed and Protect Your Plants

The best way to make sure you’ve got drought tolerant plants is to feed them regularly so that they are strong and healthy. You should also protect them with a generous layer of mulch. Organic fertilisers such as dynamic lifter and seaweed concentrate, plus good, old fashioned compost not only feed your plants, they also help improve your soil’s structure and capacity to hold water. Using an organic mulch such as sugar cane and pea straw reduces evaporation from the soil and supresses the growth of weeds. As an added bonus, strong and healthy plants are also more resistant to disease and insect attack.

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint Test.
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