How to remove vinyl floor

TM Frank
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Project Overview

Removing old vinyl flooring is a great way to give your home a quick facelift, especially if your floor is looking a little the worse for wear. It’s an inexpensive project, but you will spend a bit of time and use a fair amount of elbow grease. This video shows you what you need to know to do the job properly.
Continue to step-by-step instructions
This D.I.Y. Advice is part of a series How to lay vinyl flooring

Step by Step Instructions

1 Start by digging under a join between two vinyl sheets
2 Scrape the paper backing off the floor
3 Sand the surface with a belt sander
  • Step 1. Start by digging under a join between two vinyl sheets

    Use the blade of a large scraper to start prying the vinyl sheet off. Work in small, manageable sections of 500mm to 600mm in length. Strip the vinyl off the floor and cut each section off as you go. A lot of old houses used asbestos in their flooring. Exposure to Asbestos is very bad for your health. If you come across anything you think might be asbestos, stop work immediately and contact your local council. 
  • Step 2. Scrape the paper backing off the floor

    Vinyl is usually backed with paper. This paper will probably stay stuck to the floor. Use your scraper to lift the paper off being careful not to scratch or gouge the floor underneath. If the scraper isn’t that effective on it’s own, put on a face mask and start using your heat gun to melt the glue that’s sticking the paper to the floor. If you do use the heat gun, keep an eye on the colour of the paper. If it starts to turn brown, point the gun away so the paper doesn’t catch fire.
  • Step 3. Sand the surface with a belt sander

    Once you’ve scraped off most of the paper, use a belt sander to sand back to a clean timber surface. Start with a coarse 40-grit paper to remove the last of the glue. Then switch to a finer 120-grit to get a smoother timber finish. Always sand along rather than across the grain.

Tools and Materials

Tools

  • Belt sander
  • Dust pan and brush
  • Gloves
  • Heat gun
  • Sharp knife
  • Wide scraper
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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer or visit our Health & Safety page. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.
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